First NDIS grant opportunity in 2020

Over the last months CBB has been supporting organisations across South Australia to learn more about the Information, Linkage and Capacity Building (ILC) grant opportunities through image of grants written on paperwebinars and workshops. In our ILC Ready one on one support program we have assisted 20 organisations to identify needs in their communities, create a vision for change, and design and plan a project for social impact.

On the 10 March the first ILC grant round for 2020 opened, inviting organisations to apply for Individual Capacity Building grants (ICB round 2). A total of $ 85 million is available for projects for a period of up to two years.

 

What do ICB grants achieve? 

Projects need to ensure that people with disability have the skills and confidence to participate and contribute to the community and protect their rights through an increase in

  • Skills and capacity
  • Motivation, confidence and empowerment to act
  • Participation and contribution to community.

Grants must be developed and delivered in collaboration with people with disability and need to be for the primary and direct benefit for people with disability.

 

Who can apply for an ICB grant?

  • Disabled People’s Organisations
  • Family Organisations
  • Priority Cohort Led Organisation

As in round 1, the ICB grants are designed to support the work of Disabled People’s Organisations who are run by and for people with disabilities and strongly align with the social model of disability. The majority of paid staff (or volunteers in the absence of paid staff) need to be people with disability. Alternatively the Board needs to have more than 50% members living with a disability. To make applications easier, the NDIA has simplified the assessment criteria and thankfully published an easy read version of the grant opportunity guidelines. Grant Connect however lists 28 grant documents relating to this grant under GO3770, and finding the easy information poses a challenge.

The grant is also open for applications from Family Organisations. Yet, the definition of Family Organisation has changed from previous grants. Family Organisations are now defined as organisations that support and enhance the health, wellbeing, capacity and resilience of families and carers, and design and deliver supports or services for families and carers. Organisations supporting families (and not people with disabilities) were excluded from previous grant rounds and are now strongly encouraged to apply. Family organisations however will require over 50% of staff members that are carers and more than 50% of board members to be carers. This may pose a barrier for many organisations supporting carers and families. We believe that this is to ensure that the program is available to smaller disability organisations that are not NDIS providers or where NDIS provision is only a small part of their business. However the current funding environment means that there are few organisations who will fall into this category.

As in the previous ICB grants Priority Cohort Led Organisation are also invited to apply. For Aboriginal and/or Torrens Strait Islander communities, Culturally and Linguistically Diverse and LGBTIQA+ communities, the selection criteria have tightened.  More than 50% of staff members and 50% of board members need to identify as part of the priority cohort.

New to the list of Priority Cohort Led Organisations are organisations supporting children and young people (0-24 years) and people experiencing homelessness or at risk of homelessness. For both, the organisation only needs to demonstrate a history and a long-term commitment to supporting children or homeless people.

 

What are the NDIA’s funding priorities?

The last ICB round was highly competitive, with almost 500 applications seeking over $210 million. Only one in five applications were successful – a total of 105 grant recipients across the country.

The NDIA’s funding priorities for this grant round are regions, cohorts and organisations not funded in the first ICB round. Given children or homeless people with disability were no specifically invited in the previous rounds, we anticipate to see the approval of eligible projects supporting these communities.

The NDIA also strongly invites organisation to re-apply who had funding in the 12 month interim DPFO funding round but were not successful in the ICB round 1. The funded list of activities now includes activities that scale and extend the scope and/or coverage of previously funded ICB activities which demonstrated effective outcomes. Continuity of support is crucial for people with disability and organisations and we sincerely hope that the change in eligibility criteria does not prohibit these organisations from applying in this grant round.

 

How much funding is available?

Eligible organisations can apply for small grants starting from $10, 000 to $25,000 per year or larger grants in between $100,000 and $500,000 per year. Organisations should take notice that the total application budget should not be more than 125% of the average annual organisational budget for the past three years. This will limit the scope of work for many organisations however, it does give grassroots movements the chance to apply for some funding. Applicants for small grants only need to address two selection criteria. Organisations applying for the larger grant need to submit a more comprehensive application addressing three selection criteria.

Disabled People’s Organisations and Family Organisations that are applying for an ICB grant can in addition also apply for funds for Organisational Capacity Building, up to $50,000 per year. This will allow many to grow their organisation capacity e.g. though upskilling their staff, volunteers or board members. Applications for Organisation Capacity Building funds alone are not permitted.

 

What will increase your chances for funding?

We recommend you should start with the grant guidelines and carefully analyse the eligibility criteria. Also, critically assess if the NDIA is the appropriate funding body or should your program be funded by a different agency or department such as health or education? There is also a helpful summary of Question and Answers available on Grant Connect. Ensure you explain the specific need for people with disability in your community and that you have evidence for this need. Demonstrate how the project will create the outcomes that align with the grant objectives and that your planned activities align with grant guidelines and are for and with people with disability. Do not copy with what is already done elsewhere. The NDIA is looking for great innovative ideas that your organisation will be able to deliver. It is always better to start small and to grow slow but steady. Plans that are too ambitious could be considered high risk or not delivering value for money and could miss out on funding. If entering into partnerships, it is important to explain how these partnerships will enhance the outcome of the project and who will be doing what.

 

What if you are not eligible to apply?

We expect to see two more ILC grant rounds this year.

The Economic & Community Participation grant round 2 is expected to open in April 2020. The grant will offer three application streams: Economic Participation, Social and Community Participation and Activating Community Inclusion. Projects should commence in August 2020.

The Mainstream Capacity Building grant round 2 is anticipated to open in May 2020. The program aims at enabling service systems to be more accessible and inclusive and will start from September 2020. Given the first round focused on Health Services we expect a different priority focus this year.

There are no future rounds planned for the National Information Program.

CBB’s ILC Ready program was kindly funded by the South Australia’s Department of Human Services through its NDIA Community Inclusion and Capacity Development Grant.

Please visit our website for more information on ILC and watch our free webinars.

If you have questions or require support or if you would like to discuss ideas and priorities for your Organisational Capacity Building application please contact CBB’s Business Consultant Dr Ellen Schuler.

Dr Ellen Schuler 
Business Consultant
Email: eschuler@cbb.com.au
Phone: 1300 284 364

 

 


New ILC grant round open – Individual Capacity Building

NDIA’s ILC Investment Strategy has funding secured for Information, Linkage and Capacity Building (ILC) projects until 2022 and it’s time for another round of ILC grants.

The Individual Capacity Building (ICB) grant (round two) is expected to open for applications in just two weeks. Applications will close on the 22 April 2020.

Total funding available:  $85 million (GST excl.)
Project commencement: August/ September 2020
Project period: up to two years

Who can apply?

  • Disabled Peoples Organisations (DPO)
  • Family Organisations (FO)
  • Priority Cohort Led (PCL) organisations (Aboriginal & Torrens Strait Islander, Culturally and linguistically diverse groups, LGBTIQA+ communities)

The definition of the eligible organisation types will slightly vary from the first grant round. The NDIA has promised simplified grant opportunity guidelines and a simplified application form in plain English. The application guideline will inform organisations about the structure and questions they need to prepare for the grant applications.
Funding Priorities are cohorts and organisations in regions that were not funded in ICB round one. Also, organisations that were successful in the 12 month interim Disabled People and Families Organisations funding round and not successful in ICB round one will be prioritised.

Funding amounts per year:

  • Small grants $10 -25,000
  • Large grants $100 – 500,000

Applicants for small grants need to address two selection criteria in their application. Larger grants require a more comprehensive project proposal and answer to three selection criteria.

Disabled Peoples Organisations and Family Organisations applying for ICB can also apply for additional funds for Organisational Capacity Building, up to $50,000 per year.

Tips for successful grant application:

  • Do not duplicate already existing resources.
  • Check if the NDIA is the appropriate funding body or if the program should be funded from another source.
  • Ensure there is evidence of need and claims are substantiated.
  • Ensure people with disability are involved in the project.
  • Demonstrate how the projects aligns with the social model of disability.
  • Start small and create something that can grow bigger and can be copied elsewhere.
  • Always read the grant guidelines.

Favourable are:

  • Great innovative ideas addressing a need in your community.
  • Project and outcomes that are sustainable in the long term.
  • Collaborative partnerships that are leveraging of each other.
  • New and emerging cohort.

To develop a strong application, applicants are required to address the following questions:

  • What makes a strong application?
  • Who will you target?
  • What will you do?
  • Why is there a need for the activity?
  • Where will you deliver the activity?
  • How will the activity be developed, delivered and evaluated?
  • When will the project be delivered?

The last ICB round was a highly competitive grant round, with almost 500 applicants seeking over $210 million. Approximately one in five applications were success (to total of 105) with a funding amount of $105.875 million. Most applications were submitted in NSW (143) and Victoria (116). In SA 7 out of 38 applications received funding.

We expect to see further ILC grant rounds this year:

  • The second Economic & Community Participation grant round will offer three application streams: Economic Participation, Social and Community Participation and Activating Community Inclusion.
  • The Mainstream Capacity Building grant round two aims at enabling service systems to be more accessible and inclusive. Given the first round focused on Health Services we expect a different priority focus this year. At this stage there are no future rounds planned for the National Information Program.

For more information on ILC grants please visit ILC Ready and watch CBB’s free webinars. For questions or assistance or if you would like to discuss your Organisational Capacity Building application please contact:

Dr Ellen Schuler 
Business Consultant
Email: eschuler@cbb.com.au
Phone: 1300 763 505

 

 


NDIS Registration Rules – what’s new for providers?

The rules are changing sign

What do the changed requirements to NDIS Registration Rules mean for providers undergoing audits?

Changes to the National Disability Insurance Scheme (Provider Registration and Practice Standards) Rules 2018 (the Rules) came into effect from 1 January 2020.

The changes aim to reduce the regulatory burden on registered providers by providing:

  • a verification audit pathway for all providers delivering low risk supports regardless of legal entity, replacing certification audit pathways for bodies corporate. This effectively means a more streamlined online process for bodies corporate (through the Commission’s portal), in place of onsite audits, and;
  • a mid-term audit within 18 months of registration approval in place of yearly surveillance audits. This ultimately reduces the overall amount of auditing from two surveillances in each certification/registration cycle to one.

What will verification audits look like for body corporates?

The updated NDIS (Approved Quality Auditors Scheme) Guidelines 2018 state that auditors need to refer to the ‘current document published by the Commission which outlines the evidence that auditors must receive to assess conformity with the verification module.’ This is the NDIS Practice Standards: Verification Module – Required documentation document which is available at: NDIS Commission Verification Module.

There is a new section in this document which outlines requirements for body corporates undertaking verification. This section reads:

Bodies Corporate (excluding government providers) seeking registration for verification only registration groups are required to demonstrate the following:

Human Resource Management

  • Pre-employment checks in accordance with workers screening requirements.
  • Qualifications and/ or experience
    • In order to meet this requirement, the provider must provide evidence that one staff member who will deliver supports has met the requirements for each profession(s) the provider intends to deliver under each registration group(s). (See Requirements by Profession within the verification module)

Where a requirement includes the words ‘or equivalent’, this means an institute of a similar status to that which is referred. Factors to be taken into consideration include the relevant industries’ acknowledgement of the institute as a body, which maintains the reputation and quality of the profession, as well as the experience and qualifications required for professionals in the industry to gain membership of the institute.

Where a provider has multiple staff working with the same profession it is the ongoing responsibility of the provider to ensure staff achieve the same standard.

  • Provide the certificate of completion of the NDIS worker orientation program (mandatory training) for each staff member 
  • Personal accident insurance or worker’s compensation insurance. A certificate of currency for current insurance that meets the minimum level of cover commensurate to the scope of the provider. Providers should seek professional advice as to the type and amount of insurance that is necessary.

Incident Management

  • Describe how the provider manages incidents, or provide a copy of your incident management process, as relevant to the supports delivered for this registration group, including any relevant material provided to participants. 

The process must meet the requirements of the National Disability Insurance Scheme (Incident Management and Reportable Incidents) Rules 2018. The process should be relevant (proportionate) to the size and scale of the provider and to the scope and complexity of the supports being delivered. 

Complaints Management

  • Describe how the provider manages complaints, or provide a copy of your complaints process, as relevant to the supports delivered for this registration group, including any relevant material provided to participants. 

The process must meet the requirements of the National Disability Insurance Scheme (Complaints) Rules 2018 and follows principles of fairness and natural justice. The process should be relevant (proportionate) to the size and scale of the provider and to the scope and complexity of the supports being delivered.  

Risk Management

  • Describe or provide a copy of the providers work health and safety policies and procedures relevant to the supports delivered for this registration group, including any relevant material provided to NDIS participants. 

The policies and procedures should be relevant (proportionate) to the size and scale of the provider and to the scope and complexity of the supports being delivered. 

  • Public liability insurance. A certificate of currency for current insurance that meets the minimum level of cover commensurate to the scope of the provider. Providers should seek professional advice as to the type and amount of insurance that is necessary. 
  • Professional indemnity insurance. A certificate of currency for current insurance that meets the minimum level of cover commensurate to the scope of the provider. Providers should seek professional advice as to the type and amount of insurance that is necessary.[1]

There is still a proportional approach to processes, policies and procedures for verification, which means that body corporates with a larger workforce and large numbers of NDIS participants would be expected to have systems addressing risk management, complaints management and incident management which are commensurate with the size, scale and scope of those providers.

 

What is the impact of mid-term audits for registered providers?

The mid-term (18 month) audit has replaced the yearly ‘surveillance’ audit for registered providers. It appears that the mid-term audit will now include assessment of:

  • Division 3 of the Core Module – Governance and Operational Management as a mandatory requirement;
  • Any Standard which was identified in the previous audit as needing to implement a Corrective Action Plan; and
  • Any Standard specified by the NDIS Commission.

 

What does this mean for registered providers that have already had their first ‘surveillance’ monitoring audit in NSW and SA?

 

The updated NDIS (Approved Quality Auditor) Guidelines has a new clause to address these situations, and basically it is good news for this category of providers. Another mid-term audit is not required, if the original surveillance monitoring audit:

  • Was carried out by an Approved Quality Auditor (certification body) using certification no later than 18 months after the beginning of the provider’s registration period;
  • Assessed the Standards relating to Governance and Operational Management;
  • Assessed any specific Standards which were previously identified in the initial certification as requiring the provider to implement a corrective action plan.

It is likely in many cases that the original surveillance monitoring audit would have addressed these requirements, which means that these providers are not due for another audit until the time of the three yearly re-certification. Note: Engels Floyd has assisted a number of providers address corrective actions, so if this is an area of concern for you, please feel free to contact them.

We do encourage providers to contact their certification body to review their quote for the certification cycle, as the original quote would have been based on yearly surveillance audits.

For questions about the NDIS registration rules, comment or compliance support contact Engels Floyd, info@engelsfloyd.com or 0478 616 207.

[1] Reproduced from NDIS Practice Standards Verification Module – required documentation, January 2020 (pages 2 to 4)

Sharon Floyd

 

Sharon Floyd
Director of Engels Floyd and guest blogger for CBB.
Engels Floyd have trained all the NDIS Quality Auditors and have spoken at CBB’s Community ExecNets.

 

 


NDIS Price Guide 2020

How many times did the NDIA update the NDIS Price Guide and Support Catalogue in 2019?

  1. 2 times
  2. 4 times
  3. 6 times
  4. We’ve lost count

The NDIA introduced a long list of changes last year. There are new line items, substantial price increases and new rules regarding billable hours. Listing all changes would be impossible however if you answered A, B or C to the question above you could have overlooked some. As a result, your organisation may miss out on critical funding or potentially charge incorrectly. As a provider, you need to make sure you know and understand the Price Guide. Your organisation needs to comply with Australian consumer law and the Competition & Consumer Act, as well as treat your customers fairly and charge in accordance with the rules.

An updated list of the legal requirements of NDIS providers is available on the NDIS website here. This includes declaring your prices to participants before delivering your service and providing receipts to participants.

Here are some important NDIS Price Guide and Support Catalogue rules: Continue reading…


Higher NDIS prices for providers

In July 2019, the NDIA introduced the Temporary Transformation Payment (TTP) for providers of Assistance with Daily Living and Community Participation. The payment is only available to registered providers and is conditional to a set of obligations. The increase was welcomed by providers who continue to struggle financially with the administrative burden of the NDIS and the introduction of the Quality and Safeguard regulations and the associated compliance and audit requirements.

In a national survey among 381 disability service providers, 76% of organisations stated that they are worried that they won’t be able to provide NDIS services at current prices (NDS 2019). The TTP payment is set at 7.5% above the base price, however given the previous Temporary Support for Overheads of 2.5% was removed, it is merely a 5% incentive and this will reduce by 1.5% each year.

Continue reading…


NDIS update (from October 2019)

The NDIA announced a long list of changes and updates late last month. Here is an overview in case you have missed these:

New Price Guide and Support Catalogue valid from 1 October 2019


Disability-related health supports

The new NDIS Price Guide (version 1.2) introduces disability-related health supports as agreed by the COAG Disability Reform Council meeting in June. The NDIS will now fund health supports where the supports are a regular part of the participant’s daily life and result from the participant’s disability. Funded disability-related health supports include dysphagia supports, respiratory supports, nutrition supports, diabetic management supports, continence supports, wound and pressure care supports, podiatry and foot care supports and epilepsy supports. More information about these supports can be found in the Price Guide (page 20).

Continue reading…


Economic and Community Participation (ECP) Grant 2019-2020 and Mainstream Capacity Building (MCB) Grant 2019-2020

The NDIA has opened up two ILC grant programs for economic participation and capacity building.

Economic and Community Participation (ECP) grant program

The Economic and Community Participation (ECP) grant program offers two streams to create opportunities for people with disability to contribute and participate in community life. People with disability experience higher unemployment rates, longer duration of unemployment and a lower level of income (Australian Institute of Health and Welfare 2019).  The Economic Participation stream is targeted at employers to create new pathways to employment and increase their ability to employ people with disability and build inclusive workplaces. The grant program also offers funding for programs that foster entrepreneurship to create opportunities of successful self-employment and innovative approaches that lead to increased employment.

The Social and Community Participation stream aims to create opportunities for people with disability to participate in the same community activities as everyone else, with a focus on arts, culture, sport and recreation. Eligible activities include pilots for new pathways to leadership and civic participation, improved inclusive approaches of local communities, inclusive playgroups and/or staff and volunteer development to better work alongside people with disability.

Application that focus on activities for ILC Priority Cohort Groups (Aboriginal and Torrens Strait Islander communities, CALD communities, LGBTIQA+ cohort and communities living in rural and remote areas) are particularly encouraged to apply. The ECP grant program offers a total of $30 million over three years with a minimum funding amount of $100,000 per year. More information is available here.

Mainstream Capacity Building (MCB) grant program

The Mainstream Capacity Building (MCB) grant program funds activities that build the capacity of health organisation and services to ensure people with disability can use and benefit from the same mainstream health services as everyone else. Many people with disability experience difficulties in accessing mainstream health services. One in six people with disability have experienced discrimination by health staff (Australian Institute of Health and Welfare 2017).

The grant program is designed to help remove barriers within the heath system, including better training for health care staff about disability and inclusion, better collaboration among different sectors and improved service culture and attitudes. The funding priorities vary depending on the jurisdiction where the ILC program will be delivered. Grants start at $100,000 per year or up to $300,000 for three years. The maximum funding amount that applicants can apply for is $750,000 per year (or 2.25 million over three years). Nationally, a total of $32 million will be awarded through this program.

More information about the Mainstream Capacity Building (MCB) Grant Program 2019-2020 is available here.

Specific guidelines for each program are available on Community Grants Hub and Grant Connect. Applications are open until 21 October 2019.

For questions or support please contact:


Dr Ellen Schuler
Business Consultant
Email: eschuler@cbb.com.au
Phone: 1300 284 364


Royal Commission into violence, abuse, neglect and exploitation of people with disability

First public sitting

The Royal Commission into violence, abuse, neglect and exploitation of people with disability (DRC) is holding its first public forums in September. The community forum in Townsville on the 9 September will be followed by the first public sitting in Brisbane on 16 September where the Commissioners are formally introduced. This will allow the public to hear how the Commission will operate, what the DRC hopes to achieve and how people can engage. Anyone can attend the events with prior registration. Live webcasts of both events can be accessed here.

Terms of reference

The Royal Commission was established on 4 April 2019 and will cover all forms of violence, abuse, neglect and exploitation of people living with disability, in all settings where they occur. The Commission is led by six Royal Commissioners and the Australian Government has committed $527.9m for the inquiry, which is expected to run for three years. In comparison, the Royal Commission into Aged Care Quality and Safety was led by two Royal Commissioners for 1.5 years and a $110m budget. The large budget for the Disability Royal Commission recognises the additional support needs of people with disability to participate in the inquiry. It acknowledges the wide-ranging scope, which considers what can be done by governments, institutions, providers and the community to
  • prevent, and better protect, people with disability from experiencing violence, abuse, neglect and exploitation
  • achieve best practice in reporting, investigating and responding to violence, abuse, neglect and exploitation
  • promote a more inclusive society that supports the independence of people with disability.
People with disabilities and stakeholders will have many opportunities to provide evidence and information and share their experiences. Anyone can make a submission and can receive legal advice and advocacy assistance.

Reactive or proactive response?

The outcomes of this Royal Commission will impact on all sectors that are supporting people with disabilities and will hopefully lead to wide ranging recommendations and reforms. During the investigation people with disabilities will share traumatic events and experiences and organisations may be summoned as witnesses before the Commission to give evidence or produce documents and information. The Commissioners have wide ranging powers to interrogate and to obtain evidence which can involve rights of entry and phone tapping. The way your organisation chooses to act in the lead up and during the Royal Commission is an individual matter, however it may be perceived as an indication of your true colours and attitudes towards best practices and protecting people with disability. You may choose to bury your head in the sand and pretend that the DRC is not happening nor impacting on your organisation.  Alternatively, you may take a ‘wait and see’ approach, and only react if needed. Choosing a proactive approach by anticipating the challenges and opportunities that lay ahead will differentiate your organisation. Your response may help to protect your credibility, reputation and consumer confidence if you decide to choose a clear position on the issues and demonstrate this in your actions. Is your organisation proactively preventing abuse and neglect? How does your organisation deal with incidents and risks? How does your organisation work to eliminate restrictive practices? How do you recognise and acknowledge mistakes and learn from them? Is everyone involved in the response, including the board? What is your organisation doing to actively support the outcomes of the DRC?  How do you support your clients and their families who may choose to speak out?  How do you involve and assist staff and other stakeholders? And how to you prepare in case you will receive a notice to produce documents, or your organisation will be invited as witness? Are your records in order and accessible? Who will lead a response and who can assist (insurance, legal support and communication)? A disturbing finding from the Royal Commission into Aged Care Quality and Safety was that organisations had passed their accreditation standards despite very poor standards of care. This is highlighting that quality and safety is more than a tick box exercise and requires oversight and on-going commitment to standards that uphold fundamental human rights. Zero Tolerance is an initiative led by National Disability Services (NDS) to assist disability service providers to understand and prevent abuse. NDS is also providing information and workshops for disability service providers in preparation for the Royal Commission. For questions or comments please contact: Dr Ellen Schuler Business Consultant Email: eschuler@cbb.com.au Phone: 1300 284 364

ILC Individual Capacity Building

The NDIA recently opened grant applications for Individual Capacity Building funding. This is the first of three ILC programs that will open in August and September, with forthcoming programs for mainstream capacity building and economic and community participation opening on 9 September.

The Individual Capacity Building (ICB) program is open to organisations run by people with disabilities and their families and carers, and for priority cohort groups working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander, Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CALD) and LGBTQIA+ communities. The focus on these groups reflects their challenges in accessing community, mainstream and NDIS services for people with disabilities. For example, the NDS Quarterly Report to COAG for June 2019, showed that only 8.4% of NDS participants were from CALD communities, indicating that they are underrepresented amongst NDIS participants.

Grants under the ICB program are intended to support individuals to build the knowledge, skills and confidence they need to set and achieve their goals. They will fund peer support and leadership and professional development opportunities that will help people to speak for themselves when accessing services and engaging in their communities.

The focus on organisations that are run by people with disabilities and people from the priority cohort groups sends a powerful message that the grant program itself is practising what it preaches when it comes to inclusion – the focus is on funding organisations run by people with disabilities to build the capacity of people with disabilities.

Welcome features of the program include the introduction of a small grant stream for organisations to access grants of up to $30,000 pa for three years via a simplified application process. These funds can be used to support small scale and pilot projects – allowing organisation to test ideas. The learning that will come from projects funded under this stream will be invaluable for scalable and system-based solutions to improve inclusion. Also welcome is small scale funding for peer led groups and for place based or community of interest capacity building. These local solutions are vital for engaging people in their own communities, and funding through this ILC program is important recognition of their value and the real costs of facilitating this kind of activity. Finally, the program includes funding for organisations run by people with disabilities and their families to develop their own organisational capacity, alongside the individual capacity building work. Funding based on project interventions rarely allows for organisational development, so this is a welcome aspect of the Individual Capacity Building grants and continues a practice from previous ILC programs.

CBB is currently running a program of support – ILC Ready – to help organisations to understand ILC funding and develop their ideas for a disability inclusion project. The release of this Individual Capacity Building round has clearly caused some confusion around eligibility for ILC funding amongst some of the organisations we’ve been working with. Although grants in the Individual Capacity Building program are limited to organisations run by people with disabilities and their families and carers, and for priority cohort groups, our expectation is that the eligibility will be broader for the forthcoming rounds of economic and community participation and mainstream services. Organisations that have an idea for a project, but aren’t eligible for Individual Capacity Building funding, should study the grant opportunity guidelines for the new programs when they are issued this month, to see if they offer a better fit. In addition, we expect further ILC funding rounds to be opened in 2020, so there will be more opportunities next year for organisations who don’t have a suitable, or sufficiently developed, idea for the current grant rounds.

For more detail on the Individual Capacity Building, please see our detailed analysis HERE. Applications are via the Community Grants Hub. Details of future ILC programs will be published on the Community Grants Hub as they are released.

Jane Arnott
General Manager, Consulting and Business Services
Email: jarnott@cbb.com.au
Phone: 1300 284 364

 


ILC Individual Capacity Building Program Grant Opportunity 2019-2020

The NDIA recently opened grant applications for Individual Capacity Building funding. This is the first of three ILC programs that will open in August and September, with forthcoming programs for mainstream capacity building and economic participation. See below for our summary of the grant program.

  • Grants for:
    • Disabled Peoples Organisations/ Families Organisations (DPO/FOs)
    • Priority Cohort Led (PCL) Organisations
  • Opening date: 19 August 2019
  • Closing date: 30 September 2019 11pm
  • Outcomes for people with disabilities to
    • increase the skills and confidence to participate in and contribute to the community and protect their rights.
    • feel motivated, confident and empowered to act.
    • increase participation in and contribution to community activities.

1.   Disabled Peoples Organisations/Families Organisations (DPO/FOs)

DPO/FOs are organisations run by or for people with disabilities and/or their families. For organisations with paid staff and a board, the participation of people with disability and/or their families as board or staff members (or both) must be at least 50%. If the organisation has no paid staff, at least 50% of the organisation’s volunteers must be people with disabilities and/or their families. The DPO/FOs must actively demonstrate their commitment to the social model of disability which seeks to remove barriers to access mainstream services and live an ordinary life.

Total funding available: $80 Million (excl. GST)

Activity:

Individual Capacity Building (ICB)

  • activities that guide the capacity of people with disability by ensuring they have the knowledge, skills and confidence they need to set and achieve their goals.
  • for the primary and direct benefit for people with disability, and developed and delivered in collaboration with people with disability.
  • ICB activity maximum funding: $600,000 per year up to three years (total of $1.8 m)

 Organisational Capacity Building (OCB)

DPO/FOS who apply for Individual Capacity Building (ICB) activities can in addition apply for Organisational Capacity Building (OCB) activities.

  • OCB activity maximum funding: $50,000 per year up three years to (total of $150,000)
  • Smaller organisations can alternatively apply for small grants up to $30,000 per year (GST excl.) for up to three years by using a simplified process (without the requirement to demonstrate the capability of the organisation). The grant can be used for ICB activities only or for a combination of ICB and OCB. The total of $90,000 for the grant life cannot be exceeded.

2.   Priority Cohort Led (PCL) Organisations

a) Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities or organisations, who must be registered with the Office of the Registrar of Indigenous Corporation (ORIC)
b) Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CALD) communities
c) LGBTIQA+

Total funding available: $20 Million (excl. GST)

Activity:

Individual Capacity Building (ICB)

  • activities that guide the capacity of people with disability by ensuring they have the knowledge, skills and confidence they need to set and achieve their goals.
  • for the primary and direct benefit for people with disability and developed and delivered in collaboration with people with disability.
  • ICB activity maximum funding: $600,000 per year up to three years (total of $1.8m)

Smaller organisations can alternatively apply for small grants up to $30,000 per year (GST excl) for up to three years using a simplified process (without the requirement to demonstrate the capability of the organisation). The grant can be used for ICB activities only. The total of $90,000 for the grant life cannot be exceeded.

What activities can be funded?

Individual Capacity Building

  • Peer led support groups for people with disability
  • Peer led support groups for parents, carers and siblings of people with disability
  • Capacity building activities that enable people to speak for themselves
  • Leadership and professional development activities (individual or group based)
  • Other activities to develop the capacity of individuals with disability
  • Scaling or extending previously ILC funded individual capacity building activities

Organisational Capacity Building

Only DPO/FOs can apply for three of the following activities, in addition to their Individual Capacity Building activities:

  • Upskilling, training or developing existing or potential staff, volunteers, board members
  • Developing and delivering strategies and activities to strengthen the involvement of people with disabilities and/or families and careers
  • Developing and delivering strategies and activities to support knowledge and skill transfer between board members
  • Establishing and maintaining partnerships to collaborate with other organisations
  • Improving organisational systems or processes to deliver organisation efficiencies
  • Strengthening the quality of organisational activities
  • Strategies to upskill the organisation
  • Developing organisational strategy
  • Scoping and developing a business case for revenue generating services that lead towards financial independence

Grants up to $90,000 over total grant period

Projects are likely based in local communities and provide support for

  • existing peer led groups for the costs associated with running the group
  • small scale projects or pilot projects that contribute to building the capacity of people with disability in the community
  • capacity building of a place-based community or community of interest, while also strengthening the infrastructure of the group.

Applicants who are currently receiving ILC funding through a previous ILC grant round may apply under this grant, however they cannot apply for funding that duplicates activities or projects that have already received ILC funding to deliver. Applicants can submit a maximum of two applications under this grant round when they apply once in their own right and the second application as the lead of a consortium. Acting as an auspicor does not count towards the number of applications that an organisation is eligible to submit. The detailed grant requirements are outlined in the Individual Capacity Building (ICB) Program Grant Opportunity 2019-2020 here.


Dr Ellen Schuler 
Business Consultant 
Email: eschuler@cbb.com.au
Phone: 1300 284 364