The community impacts of COVID 19

We recently ran a grant program for community organisations, offering 20 places on a ‘Working Mind’ program to apply mindfulness and neuroscience practices to organisational leadership in a VUCA environment. We opened the program to organisations who had been particularly impacted by COVID 19.

Unsurprisingly, the program was oversubscribed. The applicant organisations were diverse – coming from every state and territory; metro, regional and remote; and covering all areas of the not for profit sector. It was hard to pick the 20 most deserving and suitable for the program, but the process gave us an insight into the way that COVID 19 is affecting communities, and the organisations that support them. Continue reading…


Risk maturity

Does this sound like you or your organisation?…..

We’ve got a risk register and mitigation plans. We report to the Board on risk every meeting. We’ve got dozens of procedures that help us with compliance and work health safety. We’re accredited to the NDIS Quality and Safeguarding standards and maybe even another different accreditation body as well. We tick the boxes on what we need to do with clinical compliance. We even have a risk policy that was based on the international standard. Surely, we are doing everything we need to on risk management, right?

Maybe. If this example sounds like you, then you are certainly doing a lot of things right on risk management, and that is really important for minimising the risk of incidents and ensuring you achieve the objectives in the strategic plan that you are aspiring towards. Continue reading…


SWOT and SOAR

Everyone has probably heard of a SWOT analysis, and most people have done one before. A SWOT can be a great way to quickly summarise many of the key issues that need to be considered in the strategy process.

In a SWOT, the strengths and weaknesses are looked at in terms of the organisation’s internal perspective. For example, what strengths and weaknesses are there with the organisation’s people, systems, technology, products/services, marketing and so on.

In my experience, many people and organisations think more highly of their strengths than they should. You might have a piece of software or a key person that you see as a strength, but wouldn’t the competitor down the road say the same thing about their organisation? Strengths need to be thought of in relation to competitors.

The opportunities and threats reflect external considerations. It might relate to growth opportunities in the market, new technology being developed, competitor actions or government policy changes, for example. Continue reading…


Data visualisation will change your life

Data visualisation will change your life and there’s a very good chance that it already has. Start-ups will talk about “hockey stick growth” and you’ve no doubt heard the term “flattening the curve”. Both terms refer to data visualisation and quite simply the insights that are drawn from being able to see past a mass of numbers, as data is presented in graphs and infographics. This cuts through the noise often created by large sets of data and allows people to see trends and outliers which in turn brings a focus to the key indicators that drive change.

Before we move to the impact that data visualisation can have, it’s worth defining data visualisation. Continue reading…


Keeping a regular eye on risk

Has there ever been a more important time to be monitoring new and emerging risks to your organisation? Perhaps it is becoming one of 2020’s most overused words that we are living in “unprecedented” times.

The emergence of the global coronavirus pandemic this year has forced every organisation to review its business continuity plan and take a number of other steps to ensure the safety of employees and clients, modify operations, change marketing priorities and shore up the financial position.

On the subject of coronavirus, CBB have shared a link to some resources available through the South Australian Department of Human Services via our LinkedIn page which readers may find of interest. Other information is available from the NDIS Quality and Safeguards Commission. Continue reading…


Understanding your market dynamics

Question: Why did the thief rob the bank?
Answer: Because that’s where the money is.

In this situation, the thief understood enough about his market to know where to find the money!

It’s important for an organisation to have a solid understanding of where the money is in their own market segment before they can maximise their organisation’s potential.

Data on the market can be used to answer a number of questions that lead to better decision making. What is the size of your market? Is it growing or contracting? Why? How is the market evolving or changing? What disruptive forces are impacting the market? How are competitors’ actions changing the market? What are the bounds and scope of the market that you are operating in? Should we look to another market segment in order to continue growing the business? How much should we spend on acquiring the knowledge necessary to answer these questions? Continue reading…


COVID-19 Impact on NDIS audits

Posted on 1 April 2020

In this time of uncertainty, many providers have been concerned about how COVID-19 will affect the rollout of planned NDIS audits.NDIS audits

The NDIS Commission has recognised that both providers and auditing bodies may experience significant disruption, which will impact on audit engagement activities.

The NDIS Commission recently issued advice recognising that the priority for infection management and continuity of support during the COVID-19 pandemic is likely to affect ‘the readiness and capacity of some providers to engage with any registration renewal audits, particularly on-site activities.’

The NDIS Commission has advised auditing bodies to: Continue reading…


The need for a whistleblowing policy

We have seen recently World Vision Australia reported on ABC news, with a staffer suspended pending investigation into an alleged conflict of interest, with the Sydney Morning Herald (SMH) saying that World Vision brushed off reports of corruption.

silver whistle

The articles describe allegations wherein the father of a senior employee was engaged to advise on the procurement of printing contracts for the organisation, and that he collected commissions from the printing company that were never disclosed to World Vision Australia.

The SMH article describes that a whistleblower made enquiries to meet with the CEO, but that the CEO’s office alerted the employee who was the subject of the allegation and did not investigate the matter appropriately.

Sadly, it is not just the corporate sector where organisations can fail to live up to their values, and the not for profit sector is not immune to this type of conduct. Continue reading…


The importance of meaningful financial terminology

spreadsheet on lap top with dictionaryDifferent roles and situations in life require us to speak a different language. The most obvious that comes to mind is when we travel or communicate with someone whose first language is different to ours. The less obvious is when the language doesn’t change but you enter into a different area that has its own terminology that provides meaningful insights and understanding within the subject area. A good example of this is sports. If you’ve ever had a conversation with someone who deeply understands a sport that you don’t, you will have noticed a range of words and expressions used that leave you confused.

Many subjects have their own terminology and the same can be said for health, science and finance. Continue reading…


Understanding market changes

Coronavirus, stock exchange losses, countries going in to lockdown, businesses being shut down, stock shortages in the shopping centres.managers having a conversation

We live in unprecedented times with the business models of decades’ old organisations quite literally changing overnight.

The radical changes we have seen over the past few weeks have demonstrated the speed at which market dynamics can change, and the need for businesses to respond quickly.

Boards and management teams are needing to respond with urgency to scenario plan and make decisions with imperfect information as the situation unfolds.

The markets that we operate in and the customers we serve are always changing. Whilst the speed of change is not necessarily what we have seen recently, now is a time not just to focus on the immediate crisis at hand, but to think about how to structure management and board meetings so that market changes form part of the regular and ongoing conversation. Continue reading…