Do you feel that you are paid fairly for your job?

The topic of salaries in not for profit organisations is a sensitive one. To a certain extent, we’ve shot ourselves in the foot with some of our messaging about ‘every cent you donate’ going to the cause, creating an expectation that employees in the not for profit sector should work for the love of it, rather than drawing a market wage.

The truth of it is that we are dealing with some of society’s most complex issues and it takes skill, experience, perseverance and long hours to lead and manage organisations that deliver social impact, meet stakeholder expectations and generate sufficient profit to keep your organisation afloat, and to invest in the necessities of new technologies and innovations. The move to consumer-directed care models in aged and disability services has pushed the sector further towards commercial business models, broadening the range of skills and experience needed to operate effectively.

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Ageism and our lack of respect

The Aged Care Royal Commission’s interim report makes for difficult reading. Its single word title “neglect” is, in itself, a smack in the face for anyone who cares about how we treat older people, which should be all of us.

The interim report outlines the following key issues:

  • Difficulties in navigating the system – once older people reach the stage of needing formal care (beyond support which can be provided by family and friends) they are thrust into a system of applications and assessments, which commoditise them into a care package and are largely conducted by phone and internet
  • Whilst home care is often the preferred option for older people, and can maintain their independence for longer, significant waiting times for home care packages are putting many people at risk and increasing the pressure on family and other informal carers
  • Substandard care is all too common in residential aged care, with ‘thoughtless acts’ that “when repeated day after day, become unkindness and often cruelty. This is how ‘care’ becomes ‘neglect’.”

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Strategy can’t be created in a vacuum

There have been radical changes to the way in which community services are funded in recent years. It’s not as simple as the money just coming from a different place, the changes have completely transformed the business model for many organisations, particularly in areas such as aged care and disability, where purchasing decisions are now made by consumers, not commissioners. This comes alongside other changes in the way that people engage with causes, organisations and work; and rapidly developing technologies and stakeholder expectations of how organisations use technology to engage and deliver services. All this means that, even if you haven’t had a major change in your business model, your organisation is still going to be impacted by a changing external context.

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Key person risk – Is your organisation vulnerable?

If your business depends on you, you don’t own a business – you have a job. And it’s the worst job in the world because you’re working for a lunatic!
– Michael E. Gerber

Organisations can live forever, but people cannot. In the UK, the oldest not for profit organisation is said to be King’s School, Cantebury which was established more than 1400 years ago in 597.

There are many factors that contribute to the longevity of an organisation and one of them is ensuring that key person risk is mitigated.

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CBB Community Business Grants

Do you feel fully on top of the business-side of running your organisation? You might be delivering outstanding social impact, but are you confident that your business practices are fit for purpose?

We work with hundreds of not for profit organisations and we see first hand the challenges of juggling the operational realities of delivering community services with the management and planning needed to run a purpose driven business. We know that many organisations do not have the time – and sometimes don’t have the in-house skills – to invest in adequately planning ahead, managing corporate functions, and continuous improvement.

As part of our commitment to reinvest some of our own funds into supporting the sector to build its business capability, we are offering a series of Community Business Grants in 2019/20. Grants will be offered on a staged basis through 2019/20 and will take the form of pro bono consulting projects in areas such as understanding your market opportunities, and financial management.

The first round will open to applications soon. Sign up for news and updates on our Community Business Grant program here, including announcements as rounds open, and access to the grant guidelines.

For any queries on our Community Business Grants contact consulting@cbb.com.au.

Jane Arnott
General Manager, Consulting and Business Services
Email: jarnott@cbb.com.au
Phone: 1300 763 505

 


Three simple truths to strengthen your organisation for change

Thinking for Change: part three

Previous blogs in this series:

Part 1: Playing with the rules 
Part 2: Finding inspiration

If you’ve been anywhere near a business blog in the last month or so, you’ve probably seen some predictions for the year ahead. While we can’t be sure which predictions will come true, one thing is certain: change will come. When it does, how will your organisation adapt? Will it respond to chaos in “firefighting mode”, or with intention and grace? Continue reading…


Reflections from 2018 Governor’s Leadership Foundation Scholarship recipient

There are many benefits to working and volunteering in the not for profit sector. A feeling of working for a higher purpose, a calling, the satisfaction that comes with an alignment of values. Yet one thing NFPs often struggle with, compared to our more affluent corporate cousins, is finding sufficient funding to train and develop staff. Which is why I felt incredibly privileged and blessed to be a recipient of a half scholarship from CBB when I was accepted into the 2018 Governor’s Leadership Foundation Program.

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Takeaways from Better Boards conference 2018

The Better Boards conference 2018 was on the theme of customer-centric governance. Inevitably, as a conference for not for profit boards, there was also broader discussion about boardJane Arnott presenting at Better Boards Conference 2018  performance and behaviours. Here’s our top takeaways from Better Boards conference 2018

Customer centricity

  1. Employee experience determines customer experience: a recurring theme from conference speakers (including our own session) was that employee engagement is the pre-requisite for high quality customer experience. Unhappy, uncommitted, disengaged employees cannot deliver high quality customer interactions. This message was neatly summarised by Charles Weiser of Optus and Campbell Page “Your customer experience can never be higher than your employee experience”.

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The characteristics of social entrepreneurs

Over recent months we’ve spoken to a number of social entrepreneurs and innovators, and observed some in action. In last month’s blog we talked about what established organisations could characteristics of social entrepreneurslearn from innovators, this month we’re reflecting more on the personal, leadership characteristics of social entrepreneurs. These are some of the common themes we’ve observed. Continue reading…


What can established organisations learn from social entrepreneurs?

social entrepreneursIn recent months we’ve been engaging with a range of social entrepreneurs and sharing some of the learning from their experience in our Foreword articles. This month we will distil some of the themes that have come through from an organisational perspective, and consider how they can be deployed in established organisations. Next month we’ll look at some of the characteristics and behaviours of innovative leaders. Continue reading…